FAQ's

  • What does farmerdisastersupport.org.au do?

    farmerdisastersupport.org.au is a website aimed at directing farmers to the assistance available. Both financial and mental health stresses can affect people during or after events such as drought, floods and cyclones. This website details the organisations, government departments and industry bodies that can help during these times.

  • What if my region is not declared?

    If your region is not declared, sign up to our newsletter and we will keep you updated. If your region is not declared this does not rule you out of financial assistance– contact your industry body, QFF, QRIDA or DAF to discuss further options.

  • How do I search for assistance?

    Input your postcode and select your industry in the search section on the homepage for results specific to your area and industry.

  • When can I apply for assistance?

    If you are in a declared zone you can apply straight away. If your zone isn’t declared please contact your industry body, QFF, QRIDA or DAF to discuss further options.

  • Who is QFF?

    The Queensland Farmers’ Federation is the united voice of intensive agriculture in Queensland. It is a federation that represents the interests of peak state and national agriculture industry organisation which in turn collectively represent more than 13,000 farmers across Queensland.

  • Who developed farmerdisastersupport.org.au

    QFF developed farmerdisastersupport.org.au with funding from the Queensland Government to assist farmers in navigating support networks available to them during times of disaster and drought. The aim of the website is to directly connect farmers with assistance available.

Recent Posts

30 Sep

Farmers must prepare now for La Niña impacts

Queensland farmers are encouraged to prepare their properties and infrastructure to mitigate…

Queensland farmers are encouraged to prepare their properties and infrastructure to mitigate any potential impacts of a severe weather event, after the Bureau of Meteorology declared that La Niña has developed in the Pacific Ocean.

This follows central and eastern tropical Pacific Ocean sea surface temperatures exceeding La Niña thresholds and atmospheric indicators, including the Southern Oscillation Index, trade winds and cloud also at La Niña levels.

These recent changes in ocean temperatures and weather patterns over the Pacific are now likely to remain until at least the end of the year.

La Niña is typically associated with above-average spring rainfall for Australia, particularly across eastern, central and northern regions.

It can also mean cooler days, more tropical cyclones, and an earlier onset of the first rains of the wet season across the north.

Current climate outlooks indicate the remainder of 2020 will be wetter than average across the eastern two thirds of Australia.

The last La Niña event occurred from 2010-2012 and resulted in one of Australia’s wettest two-year periods on record. Widespread flooding occurred in many parts of Australia associated with the record rainfalls.

It is likely this year will not see the same intensity as this La Niña event, but is still likely to be of moderate strength.

Preparing for a severe weather event as a result of La Niña now will ensure the state’s farmers can get back to doing what they do best sooner – producing world class food, fibre and foliage.

Read More
28 Jan

Support for bushfire affected communities

A recovery package to support the mental health and resilience of communities has…

Recent Posts

New drought centre opens in Toowoomba

New drought centre opens in Toowoomba

1 month
Beard NOT needed to win

Beard NOT needed to win

1 month
Drought sent Hick family to Plan X

Drought sent Hick family to Plan X

1 month, 1 week
Hay runner has new project in his range

Hay runner has new project in his range

1 month, 1 week
Roma producer sells breeder herd to survive dry

Roma producer sells breeder herd to survive dry

1 month, 1 week
‘2013 was a horror movie’

‘2013 was a horror movie’

1 month, 2 weeks
No pot of rain gold at Eldorado

No pot of rain gold at Eldorado

1 month, 3 weeks
Four years in drought – looking back

Four years in drought – looking back

1 month, 3 weeks
Cattle cycle returns, minus the price pain

Cattle cycle returns, minus the price pain

1 month, 4 weeks
Drought status revoked for northern shires and Southern Downs

Drought status revoked for northern shires and Southern Downs

2 months, 2 weeks
Drought fix-up crew at Cunnamulla

Drought fix-up crew at Cunnamulla

3 months, 3 weeks
Hay runner responds to call for cash

Hay runner responds to call for cash

3 months, 3 weeks
Western Queensland debates cost of hay

Western Queensland debates cost of hay

4 months
‘You showing up is the big lift we need’: Muttaburra to Hay Runners

‘You showing up is the big lift we need’: Muttaburra to Hay Runners

4 months, 3 weeks
Faces of the Muttaburra hay run | Photos

Faces of the Muttaburra hay run | Photos

4 months, 4 weeks
Ilfracombe says ‘thank you’ to Hay Runners

Ilfracombe says ‘thank you’ to Hay Runners

4 months, 4 weeks
Hay Runners’ drought relief totals $170m

Hay Runners’ drought relief totals $170m

4 months, 4 weeks
Cyclone ‘Burrumbuttock’ ready to deliver hay relief

Cyclone ‘Burrumbuttock’ ready to deliver hay relief

5 months
Financial counsellors prepare for drought support payments ending

Financial counsellors prepare for drought support payments ending

5 months, 3 weeks