Disaster Contacts

Department of Agriculture & Fisheries: 13 25 23

QRIDA: 1800 623 946

Queensland Farmers’ Federation (QFF): (07) 3837 4731

 

Industry bodies

CANEGROWERS:

  • Brisbane: (07) 3864 6444
  • Mackay: (07) 4944 2600
  • Proserpine: (07) 4945 1844

Growcom:

  • Brisbane: (07) 3620 3844
  • Bowen: (07) 4785 2860

Nursery & Garden Industry Queensland (NGIQ):

  • Brisbane: (07) 3277 7900

Queensland Dairyfarmers’ Organisation

  • Brisbane (07) 3236 2955

For region specific information please input your postcode for localised contacts HERE.

AgForce:

  • Brisbane: (07) 3236 3100

Disaster Support FAQs

  • What assistance is available in my area?

    The Queensland Rural and Industry Development Authority lists the type and level of assistance available. You can access that information HERE.

    For further details on what services are available in your area, use the postcode search on the home page.

  • How can I report damage?

    You can report damage by contacting your industry association. Various industry organisations and the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (DAF) are collecting data for primary producers. This data will be collated and reported through the Disaster Recovery Funding Arrangements (DRFA).

  • How can I access the assistance available?

    Assistance is managed by Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (DAF) and QRIDA:

    • DAF – 13 25 23
    • QRIDA – 1800 623 946

     

    For details on Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (DAF) and QRIDA officers in your area, use the postcode search on the home page.

  • How can I apply for an individual disaster declared property and what does that get me?

    If a primary producer is not in an area where Disaster Recovery Funding Arrangements (DRFA) assistance is available but has suffered significant damage from a natural disaster, they can apply for an Individual Disaster Stricken Property (IDSP) declaration. Freight subsidies can be applied for under an IDSP declaration.

    To obtain an IDSP declaration, contact Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (DAF) – 13 25 23.

     

  • What is category A, B, C & D assistance?

    Category A – Standard assistance measures:

    • Counter Disaster Operations
    • Personal Hardship Assistance scheme

    Category B – Standard assistance measures:

    • Restoration of Essential Public Assets (councils)
    • Freight Subsidies (primary producers)
    • Concessional loans (primary producers, small business, not-for-profits)

    Category C – Standard assistance measures:

    • Recovery grants (primary producers small business, not-for-profits)

    Category D – Standard assistance measures:

    • Enhanced concessional loans, other ‘one off’ programs.
  • When can I expect to receive grants or concessional loans after application?

    Both Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (DAF) and QRIDA will receive a large amount of applications throughout this process so extra staff has been called upon to assist. DAF and QRIDA aim to process applications as quickly as possible and it’s suggested you call DAF or QRIDA to check on the status of your application.

  • I’m worried about my neighbours, they’re not coping, how can I support/help them?

    There are several phone support services as well that urge people to use these as they recovery from the disaster.

    • Beyond Blue – 1300 22 4636
      See Beyond Blue’s guide to looking after yourself following a disaster HERE.
    • Lifeline – 13 11 14
    • Country Call Back – 1800 54 33 54
  • As an employer, what are my responsibilities to casual and permanent staff when I can’t employ them?

    Following a disaster many employers may be concerned about the availability of work for casual and permanent staff members. As an employer, you have an obligation to ensure your current employees are kept as informed as possible of the status of their positions with your business during this uncertain time. Employees need to be aware that it may be a possibility that the loss of production may result in the loss of their jobs.

    If it is not viable to keep your employees employed, and you have exhausted all other options to try and keep your employees on, redundancy will be your final option. Both permanent and casual employees are entitled to final pays, including redundancy payouts. There are several terms and conditions around these circumstances which employers need to be aware of.

    To find out more:

    • See Fairwork Australia’s fact sheet on employment conditions during natural disasters and emergencies HERE.
    • See information on redundancy HERE.
    • Or call Susie Butterworth of GROWCOM on 07 36203 813 or email wrteam@growcom.com.au

Recent Posts

30 Sep

Farmers must prepare now for La Niña impacts

Queensland farmers are encouraged to prepare their properties and infrastructure to mitigate…

Queensland farmers are encouraged to prepare their properties and infrastructure to mitigate any potential impacts of a severe weather event, after the Bureau of Meteorology declared that La Niña has developed in the Pacific Ocean.

This follows central and eastern tropical Pacific Ocean sea surface temperatures exceeding La Niña thresholds and atmospheric indicators, including the Southern Oscillation Index, trade winds and cloud also at La Niña levels.

These recent changes in ocean temperatures and weather patterns over the Pacific are now likely to remain until at least the end of the year.

La Niña is typically associated with above-average spring rainfall for Australia, particularly across eastern, central and northern regions.

It can also mean cooler days, more tropical cyclones, and an earlier onset of the first rains of the wet season across the north.

Current climate outlooks indicate the remainder of 2020 will be wetter than average across the eastern two thirds of Australia.

The last La Niña event occurred from 2010-2012 and resulted in one of Australia’s wettest two-year periods on record. Widespread flooding occurred in many parts of Australia associated with the record rainfalls.

It is likely this year will not see the same intensity as this La Niña event, but is still likely to be of moderate strength.

Preparing for a severe weather event as a result of La Niña now will ensure the state’s farmers can get back to doing what they do best sooner – producing world class food, fibre and foliage.

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Support for bushfire affected communities

A recovery package to support the mental health and resilience of communities has…